serendipidy

Toscano gold-dusted champagne truffles, c/o Harrods, c/o The Daily Mail; feat. Amedei Toscano Black 70 extra-dark chocolate.

Sorry, that was just a vageuly seasonal distraction. Remember, boys and girls: chocolate is for EVERY DAY, not just for Christmas Easter.

First, a couple of digressions.

DIGRESSION ONE:

DIGRESSION TWO:

On which subject of what lies beyond infinity, here’s how to be a bad MUAer:

A = new person, little to no useful information on profile page, no reviews made. But s/he hasn’t been the kind of  Generation Y/me/now idiot we see too much of. You know the sort of person: “contributions” are asking questions incessantly, often repeating them, bratty shouty ALL CAPS REPLY TO ME RIGHT NOW *stamp foot . A sponge and a drain.

A, however, has been very nice (and showing due respect for the MUA equivalent of elders and betters).

However …

B = old MUAer, found of knowledge and wisdom. Also, located in a different place. A completely different country.
Note to A: *EYEROLL* GET OFF YOUR ARSE AND GO LOOK IN THE DAMN SHOPS, GIRL!
(And don’t annoy B, because that’s not a good idea.)

On to the real business of this here post.

Continued from yesterday’s post and its updates-as-a-reply under it:

And then we get this, wonder of wonders, miracle of miracles, and true light of wisdom, truth, and knowledge:

SerendipitousAerie

Interesting, however you may be overlooking one big point. I tan. (This is a personal choice and yes, I am aware of the dangers, the hype and so on and so forth) When I’m in the sun I use sesame oil to protect my skin. Sesame oil helps prevent burn and protect my skin. This is an ancient ayurvedic recipe and I can only assume the turmeric comes from a similar background as in ayurveda turmeric is a prized substance for many things and is considered somewhat of a cure-all. I have no doubt that turmeric will protect one against the damages of the sun. But it’s not going to work the way a tube of spf works. No more than the sesame oil does. Turmeric benefits would work in much the same way a healthy diet protects your immune system from diseases.This, if it does everything these pages claim, would be better done as a lifestyle change not a take a dose before you sun kind of thing. Ayurveda does not work on that principle. Please understand I am not saying that if you put turmeric on your skin or take it in doses it won’t work. In fact, yes, I do use turmeric on a daily basis for medicinal purposes and I have nothing short of a great deal of respect for it and it’s many highly valued properties and uses. Turmeric may well be the greatest protection from sunlight damage ever known to man. I, as a supporter of turmeric would love to see this. But the information you’ve provided here does nothing to substantiate that it would do so.
As for staining one’s skin with turmeric. You have to be kidding me. I use turmeric in bulk and often get it on my fingers. It stains a horrible yellow, in fact, now that you mention it, it looks like fake tan lotion on steroids. Turmeric is a wonderful medicine. I hope you take the time to do some serious research on it.

My initial reaction:
facepalm

But no: reread carefully. There’s a lot of sense here. Rewritten with actual paragraph-divisions, here’s what you get:

Interesting, however you may be overlooking one big point.

I tan. (This is a personal choice and yes, I am aware of the dangers, the hype and so on and so forth) When I’m in the sun I use sesame oil to protect my skin. Sesame oil helps prevent burn and protect my skin.

This is an ancient ayurvedic recipe and I can only assume the turmeric comes from a similar background as in ayurveda turmeric is a prized substance for many things and is considered somewhat of a cure-all.

I have no doubt that turmeric will protect one against the damages of the sun. But it’s not going to work the way a tube of spf works. No more than the sesame oil does. Turmeric benefits would work in much the same way a healthy diet protects your immune system from diseases.This, if it does everything these pages claim, would be better done as a lifestyle change not a take a dose before you sun kind of thing. Ayurveda does not work on that principle.

Please understand I am not saying that if you put turmeric on your skin or take it in doses it won’t work. In fact, yes, I do use turmeric on a daily basis for medicinal purposes and I have nothing short of a great deal of respect for it and it’s many highly valued properties and uses. Turmeric may well be the greatest protection from sunlight damage ever known to man. I, as a supporter of turmeric would love to see this.

But the information you’ve provided here does nothing to substantiate that it would do so.

As for staining one’s skin with turmeric. You have to be kidding me. I use turmeric in bulk and often get it on my fingers. It stains a horrible yellow, in fact, now that you mention it, it looks like fake tan lotion on steroids.

Turmeric is a wonderful medicine. I hope you take the time to do some serious research on it.

I take the facepalm back entirely. I’m leaving it in this post, as an integral part of it, to demonstrate AN IMPORTANT POINT:

Reading is important. So is rereading. And re-rereading. Carefully and attentively.

Actually: for Green Board purposes, the Serendipidous one provided the very best response possible. Consider what sorts of people (OK, and maybe the odd fake-person a.k.a. occasional leisurely shit-stirring troll) frequent it.  Much of its population is hippy-dippy spoiled brats, scientifically ignorant and actively anti-science (perhaps because they didn’t want to do it at school/university and were allowed not to, indulged by their parents—”oh, but little diddums is too sensitive and creative for that sort of thing”— and now maybe regret it a little?), touchy-feely, purity-obsessed, “my body is a temple.” Vancouver residents, you’ve probably met many such people. They live in Kitsilano. Yummy mummies, yoga bunnies, and other vacuous obnoxious witless twats.

Full of the milk of human kindness I am.

But squishy, woolly, and cuddly too.

Hence my formal comment over on MUA Green board:

2nd that last comment, “I hope you take the time to do some serious research on it” as with anything else, and indeed *using sunscreen*. Add: if something’s new to, or not yet been proven/disproven by (experimental) science: go forth and experiment! Do the ground-work, and research, and gather data, and analyse it, and publish, do meta-data analyses and so on. Including bringing in, in the case of Ayurvedic medicine, centuries’ experimental data (from applied knowledge, use, etc.: just like with “western” medicine too–including its earlier pre-modern components–and “traditional” medical remedies in the European canon).

Yes, universities and hospital research centres are doing this: same goes for Chinese medicine and “traditional/folk” medicine worldwide. And have been doing so for decades now. And that’s been producing medicines (and in some cases synthesizing new molecules, thus sparing natural resources) and helping alleviate and even cure many diseases and other medical conditions. Huzzah!

Ex. on turmeric: Google searches for the following turmeric-derived chemical compounds will yield a fair amount of information; add search-terms like “antioxidant,” “skin,” “sun,” etc:
curcumin
curcuminoid(s)
turmerone

Though most of the data on sun protection is similar to that for any other antioxidant, from assorted source-materials: beta-carotene, assorted forms of vitamin C, and catechins (= tea polyphenols: especially apigallocatechin gallate).

No reason to reject Ayurvedic medicine because it hasn’t been tried and tested in the 20th century in the West. Nor, for that matter, to reject “western science” (and, well, the factual reality of how things work) because of not understanding it, never learning it in school, and then rejecting it through ignorance.

Ignorance is dangerous, especially when accompanied by blind belief. Have a look at http://www.nanohelthtechnology.com to see how it gets exploited and manipulated, to someone else’s pure profit.

2nd SerendipitousAerie on this other point too–“the information you’ve provided here does nothing to substantiate that it would do so”–when you see the rest of that site that bohogirl10 kindly shared with Green Board. I’m sure she meant well: from past experience, boho really is 100% all heart!!!

Additional comment, not on MUA just a special bonus for readers of ye blogge; as a warning / FYI for anyone out there who’s susceptible to burning:

On the other hand:

Speaking as a pale person who BURNS. And has had a suspicious growth removed.

Burning, cancer, and how ultra-violet radiation work are not a question of “personal choice” or opinion, nor are they “hype.”

I wear sunscreen every day (plus the tried-and-tested traditional method of covering up using clothing) for the rest of her life. This on medical advice, from actual medical doctors, having done the reading myself, having had some science education and then supplemented that basis with doing further reading.

And no, I am ****ing not using sesame oil (let alone turmeric). FFS. My mother tried basting me in various things when I was a child, thinking it would “toughen me up” (she’s dark and tans). It didn’t work. Ever. I burned (which hurts, by the way: another reason to avoid it). I increased an already-high cancer risk. Anyone else out there whose skin looks anything like mine: do please be careful.

So yes, absolutely: “do some serious research.” And if you’re a high cancer risk, don’t go covering yourself in something (or simply eating lots of it), until there’s more conclusive data (inc. specifically on, say, flammable gingers…) that it ALONE will work, and substitute for sunscreen.

In the meantime, I’m eating (tomatoes, berries, plenty other fruit) and drinking lots of things containing lots of antioxidants (yay go my current fave: green or white tea with ginger!), and using them topically (MAP serum, rosehip seed oil). But I’m also using sunscreen. Defence on several fronts, rather than just one: be that only using sunscreen, or just oil-basting, or ingestion.

Back to hippydippyness: call this a synergistic holistic approach if you will…

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